Over 52.000 students and lecturers protested at Britain’s Parliament in central London. They made very clear while cutting state funding, their anger at government plans to improve tuition fees. The government maintains that the rise in fees is part of the attempt to attack the deficit. What it does in fact, it transfers the cost of higher education in the state onto students and their families.

After the results of the vote was announced, the demonstrators became really angry. They were faced by the cops who once again, used their ‘containment’ tactic, also known as kettling, within their attempt to command the specific situation. When the pupils felt suffocated by the authorities blocking them from all sides the tactic failed as usual, they reacted naturally in a violent way.

The confrontation continued for several hours and disperse to the trendy West End and Trafalgar Square from Westminster. Big Brother media and Prime Minister Cameron were foreseeable and unanimous in their condemnations of the violent actions of the demonstrators.

What exactly was all the fuss about?

First the government insists the law about raising universities tuition fees is a necessary allowance driven portion and by the recession of the authorities austerity plan. In a lame effort to produce the general public this unfair and unpopular law more palatable the government maintained the law is aimed to help poor students. This really is naturally simply window dressing, social engineering at its pathetic worst.

The voting on the law that was massively unpopular activated the biggest student demonstration in generations. The students as well as the lecturers labeled these cuts as barbaric.

The media of the institution cried ‘wolf’ regarding the degree of violence into which this demonstration escalated.

Yes, a couple benches and a Christmas tree was burned, a couple of cops were hurt in skirmishes with demonstrators while using heavy containment strategies, a few windows were broken and oh, almost forgot, Prince Charles’ limousine rear window was cracked much to his dismay (and Camilla’s surprise).

The student protests in Montreal have gotten so intense that authorities have made over 2500 arrests and also the fire is spreading to Ontario, where pupils are coordinating similar rallies in the forthcoming months. Considering that Quebec gets the best average tuition rates in the country, and Ontario has got the highest (about $6600, over two and a half times that of Quebec), the debate over reachable education is likely to move further and further to the public eye.

Putting aside human rights issues and the legalities surrounding the protests, one thing is clear: students are seriously interested in lowering the price of post-secondary education and minimizing the burden of debt it leaves on graduates in the years to come.

Still, even though this is actually the turning point in the struggle for accessible instruction, what can students do to ease their financial woes?

Surprisingly, among the easiest ways would be to utilize the support already provided by the authorities – student tax credits. Plenty of students are so preoccupied using the money they owe that they have forgotten about the taxed income to that they are entitled. The truth is, students can maintain expenses that are enough to cut back their taxable income and also rack up a tax return of thousands of dollars each year.

So long as you have a tax receipt from your own educational institution, you can claim a set monthly amount, in addition to the expense of tuition. You also live on campus or whether you’re a commuter, you can reap the benefits of the pupil tax credit system.

These credits may even be accustomed for their advantage, as they could be transferred when the pupil’s taxable income has been reduced to zero if the parents are the ones worried about paying for his or her children’s education.

The advantages don’t end upon graduation. For people taking several years to settle their loans, every little bit helps and this yearly refund could end up making a noticeable difference and shorten the period of time it requires to eliminate debt.